A Forgiving Heart

As the follower of God, we can rejoice in suffering because of the the good work of the Lord intends to accomplish through it. When offenses usher us into the classroom of trials and tribulations, we have an opportunity to grow in maturity and be filled with a greater understanding of His love. Ask Him how God wants us to demonstrate His love to our offender. We should be able to invest in his life through prayer, words of affirmation acts of service or material gifts. Whether the offense was intentional or not, forgiveness enables us to have a greater concern for a person after he offends us than had before he offended us. It opens our heart to cooperating with the Lord in his life and our sincere love for him allows us to minister to him and help him mature.

“Instead, if your enemy is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him a drink. By doing this, you will pile burning coals of fire upon his head. Don’t be afraid by evil, but defeat evil with good.” (Romans 12:20-21)

An important aspect of forgiveness can be the ability to invest in the life of our offender. When we willingly give to an offender, He can supernaturally give us sincere love toward that person.

Bishop Jordan forgiveness and pardon are two separate issues. Forgiveness is a personal decision to release an offender from our condemnation. Pardon is a release from the legal penalties of an offense. We can forgive an offender and no longer hate him/her or wish him/her harm, but we cannot pardon him/her unless we have the authority to do. Christ is the greatest example of one who forgave a freely. In the midst of Christ suffering, Christ was not bitter toward those who beat Him and nailed Him to the cross. Christ knew they were carrying out the purpose of the Lord for his life. Christ chose to love instead of hate. Christ chose to trust and obey His Father rather than take vengeance on His enemies.